Saltaire Village, World Heritage Site
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Colin Coates, historian
WW1: The Saltaire Story
Second Boer War
Reel Lives
Social History
Richard Coomber's research
   
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Oates, Mark
1889 – 11 December 1946

Mark Oates was the son of Joseph Oates. Joseph was born c1853 in North Bierley. He married Ellen Mallinson 27 February 1875 at Bradford Cathedral.
 
Mark, the youngest of five children, was born 1889 in North Bierley. In 1891 the family were living in Wibsey with Joseph working as a stone mason. By 1901 Joseph had died leaving Ellen living with their children in Buttershaw. In 1911 Mark was working as a warehouseman and living with his widowed mother in Wibsey. Mark married Ann Elizabeth Jeffrey 30 May 1914 at St. Pauls Buttershaw.

Mark served in and survived the war. From 1918 he lived with his wife at 22 Albert Terrace in Saltaire. In 1926 they moved to 16 Fanny Street in Saltaire, where they remained until Mark died 11 December 1946. In his will he left his wife £484 91s 10d (in 2014 terms £17,700).

Oates, Norman
1891 – 29 June 1960

Norman Oates was the son of Herbert Willie Oates. Herbert was born 1861 in Halifax. He married Mary Elizabeth Black 1 January 1890 at St. Marks Manningham.
 
Norman, the eldest of three children, was born 1891 in Bradford. In 1891 the family were living in Manningham with Herbert working as a woollen warehouseman. By 1901 they were living in Horton and by 1911 at 26 St. Chads Road in Bradford.

Norman, working as a butcher, married Henrietta Kitchen 10 December 1913 at St. Peters Shipley. Until after the war was over the married couple lived with Henrietta’s family in Saltaire at 6 George Street, 18 Albert Terrace and 49 Titus Street.

Norman served as a Bombardier in the Royal Field Artillery and he survived the war. From 1920 he lived with his family in Bingley. Norman died 29 June 1960 in Bingley.

O’Donnell, Gordon
1895 – ????
[Updated: 21 August 2017]

Gordon O’Donnell was the son of Michael O’Donnell. Michael was born 1853 in Bradford. He married Hannah Maria Eggleton in 1873.  In 1881 they were living at 2 Albert Terrace in Saltaire with Michael working as a grease extractor in the woollen trade. By 1891 they had moved to 32 George Street in Saltaire.

Gordon, the youngest of nine children, was born 1895 in Saltaire. By 1901 the family were living at 45 George Street in Saltaire, where they remained throughout the war. In 1911 Gordon was working as a warp twister.

Gordon O'DonnellGordon enlisted 17 November 1914 and saw active service from when he was posted 16 April 1915. He served in the scout section of the 6th Battalion Prince’s of Wales’s Own West Yorkshire Regiment reaching the rank of Corporal. Here are two extracts from the Shipley Times 5 April 1918:

“Members of the Shipley Golf Club who were at the club house on Monday were pleased to see one of their caddies, Corporal O’Donnell, who was recently awarded the Military Medal and bar. O’Donnell whose home is in George St. Saltaire is at present home on leave. As the result of passing the hat round an 'Easter egg' of 30s was handed to him by Mr. F. L. Wade”.

“Winner of the Military Medal, and subsequently of a bar to it, Corporal Gordon O’Donnell, a scout in the West Yorkshire Regiment, whose home is at 45 George Street Saltaire, had an enthusiastic reception at the Bradford Khaki Club on Wednesday afternoon before he set out for the front again later in the day. The lounge room was crowded with uniformed men of the Forces, who cheered when Major Stapleton, the officer commanding the troops at the Bradford Moor Barracks, pinned the decoration on his tunic, and Mr. H. C. Derwent, a prominent worker and official in connection with the club, presented him with a silver cigarette case on behalf of the club.
Corporal O’Donnell won the medal for securing very valuable information in the German lines on 30 July 1917. Against an enemy patrol in Belgium he and another corporal were under continuous fire for an hour, and they had to swim a river over which the Germans had drawn a bridge. Cpl. O’Donnell subsequently destroyed the bridge and swam back to safety.
Major Stapleton said it was an honour to pin on this man’s breast this medal for distinguished bravery in the field. Handing the cigarette case over, Mr Derwent said it would be suitably inscribed for Cpl. O’Donnell, who was a fine specimen of a soldier.
 'I only did my duty,' said Cpl. Donnell in reply, 'and will always try to do that.'
The bar won by the corporal is for patrol work on 1 March 1918, when he brought in a wounded comrade after narrowly escaping with his life under machine gun and rifle fire.”

Gordon survived the war and was discharged 16 March 1919. He was working as a weft man when he married Edith Hiley 14 February 1920 at Holy Trinity, Wibsey. From 1921 to 1931 they lived at 34 Whitlam Street in Saltaire.

Gordon had two elder brothers, John & Herbert, who were both killed in the Second Boer War (11 October 1899 to 31 May 1902).

Oddy, James
1894 – 19 October 1916

James Oddy was the son of James Oddy (senior).James (senior) was born c1858 in Shipley. He married Sarah Jane Johnson 26 Dec 1880 in Shipley. Sarah died in 1895.

James, the youngest of five children, was born 1894 in Shipley. In 1901 he was living with his Aunt, Elizabeth Johnson, at 26 Rhodes Street in Saltaire. In 1911 he was a mill hand living in Baildon with his brother in law, David Denbigh.

James served as a Private with the 21st (Service) Battalion Prince of Wales’s Own West Yorkshire Regiment. The Battalion, known as the Wool Textile Pioneers, was formed in Halifax 24 September 1915. They moved to Skipton in February 1916 and they were in France by June 1916. James died 19 October 1916; his grave can be found at Guards Cemetery in Lesboeufs, Somme, France. James is not remembered on any Roll of Honour in the Shipley area.

Ogden, Fred
1895 – ????

Joseph Ogden was the son of Henry Ogden. Henry was born c1861 in Shipley.  He married Julia Howker 22 November 1884 at St Wilfrids Calverley. In 1890 the family were living at 4 Bath Buildings in Saltaire (now demolished). 

Fred, the middle son of five sons, was born 1895 in Saltaire. In 1891 & 1901 the family were living at 38 Helen Street in Saltaire with Joseph working as a stoker. By 1902 they had moved to 26 Constance Street in Saltaire. Joseph died around 1906. In 1911 widowed Julia and her sons were living at 8 Oastler Road in Shipley. They moved to 26 Rhodes Street in Saltaire in 1913 and Julia remained there until her death in 1922.

In 1911 Fred was working as a wool comber. Fred served his country and survived the war. He married May Doris Bacon, 8 April 1916, at St. Peters Shipley. 
Fred had three brothers, Tom, Willie and Joseph who all served their country by fighting in the war.   

Ogden, Joseph
1885 – 7 December 1916

Joseph Ogden was the son of Henry Ogden. Henry was born c1861 in Shipley.  He married Julia Howker 22 November 1884 at St Wilfrids Calverley.

Joseph, the eldest of five sons, was born 1885 in Idle. In 1890 the family were living at 4 Bath Buildings in Saltaire (now demolished). In 1891 & 1901 the family were living at 38 Helen Street in Saltaire with Joseph working as a stoker. By 1902 they had moved to 26 Constance Street in Saltaire. Joseph died around 1906. In 1911 widowed Julia and her sons were living at 8 Oastler Road in Shipley. They moved to 26 Rhodes Street in Saltaire in 1913 and Julia remained there until her death in 1922.

In 1901 Joseph was working a spinner doffer and in 1911 he was a wool comber. Joseph served as a Private with the 8th Battalion Duke of Wellington (West Riding Regiment).

Joseph died 7 December 1916 and he is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial near Albert in France. He is also remembered on the Rolls of Honour at Nab Wood and St. Peters. Joseph had three brothers, Willie, Fred and Tom who all served their country by fighting in the war. 

Ogden, Willie
1892 – ????

Willie Ogden was the son of Henry Ogden. Henry was born c1861 in Shipley.  He married Julia Howker 22 November 1884 at St Wilfrids Calverley. In 1890 the family were living at 4 Bath Buildings in Saltaire (now demolished).

Willie, the second eldest of five sons, was born 1892 in Saltaire. In 1891 & 1901 the family were living at 38 Helen Street in Saltaire with Joseph working as a stoker. By 1902 they had moved to 26 Constance Street in Saltaire. Joseph died around 1906.

In 1911 widowed Julia and her sons were living at 8 Oastler Road in Shipley. They moved to 26 Rhodes Street in Saltaire in 1913 and Julia remained there until her death in 1922.

In 1911 Willie was working at sea as a stoker. Willie was serving aboard HMS Euryalas  in 1915, he survived the war.

Willie had three brothers, Tom, Fred and Joseph who all served their country by fighting in the war.

Ogden, Tom
1896 – 7 December 1916

Tom Ogden was the son of Henry Ogden. Henry was born c1861 in Shipley.  He married Julia Howker 22 November 1884 at St Wilfrids Calverley. In 1890 the family were living at 4 Bath Buildings in Saltaire (now demolished). In 1891 & 1901 the family were living at 38 Helen Street in Saltaire with Joseph working as a stoker. 

Tom, the second youngest of five sons, was born 1896 in Saltaire. In 1902 the family were living at 26 Constance Street in Saltaire. Joseph died around 1906.
In 1911 widowed Julia and her sons were living at 8 Oastler Road in Shipley. They moved to 26 Rhodes Street in Saltaire in 1913 and Julia remained there until her death in 1922.

In 1911 Tom was working as a spinner. Tom served his country and survived the war. Tom had three brothers, Willie, Fred and Joseph who all served their country by fighting in the war.  

 
 


 

 
   

 
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